Development Study: The British Diet Through Time

I’ve written in brief about the development study we’ve taught in year 8 this year, here and here, where I explain my efforts to get students reading difficult sources.

Having explained the annotated timeline assessment as part of the HA presentation on Friday, a couple of people asked about the scheme of work, so I am now sharing it. It is a work in progress but, truthfully, I probably won’t work on it until it’s time to teach it again in the autumn, so I thought I would put up what I’ve got.

The focus is on events that changed the British diet from 1000 to present day. It picked up a couple of things that we don’t currently teach elsewhere, such as the Crusades and the Tudor explorers, and provided a good way in to the British Empire by looking at tea and sugar. As I mentioned during the workshop, it should extend forward into the 20th century and I really feel we missed a trick by not covering rationing, which would create a nice measure for how diet had changed since 1000 (what were we eating from overseas); but I got so carried away with looking at the potato that we ran out of time. That potato! Definitely now my favourite tuber.

Here are my resources:

Scheme of Work

Food Assessment Sheet

(I did try to put these in a .zip but WordPress wasn’t having any of it)

How the potato changed the world
Potato paragraph descriptors
Potato paragraph descriptors – correct order
Potato questions

Description of tobacco

Tea – Catherine of Braganza source
Tea – clippers source
Tea – Wikipedia source

Sugar info

Really glad I’ve looked over this again because it has reminded me that I wanted to do some reading on Braudel, who pops up in at least two of my sources. The summer reading pile grows…

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