Category Archives: edfest

Edfest: Gove

Seventy five minutes late, and looking hot and bothered. Did he ever expect to be education secretary? No. He never expected to go into politics, but was treated to a call to arms by David Cameron as a journalist critical … Continue reading

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Edfest: Swinson

Jeremy Swinson is speaking to a packed room about his research on reducing low level disruption, specifically the relationship between teacher verbal feedback and pupil engagement. His research showed that there were small variations between urban and rural schools; wider … Continue reading

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Edfest: Kynaston Panel

I come late to the panel about breaking down the Berlin Wall between private and state education, in times to hear James O’Shaughnessy suggest that non-pupil-premium parents might want to donate a similar amount of funding (£1300) to their child’s … Continue reading

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Edfest: Rob Coe

Rob is speaking on getting teachers better. We begin with what does better look like? Rob asks whether the teachers in the room know what they need to do to improve, how to do it, why to do it, and … Continue reading

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Edfest: Sherrington

Tom’s first session is about great teaching: mechanics with soul. He says his message is about mixing traditional and progressive pedagogy, rather than seeing them as separate poles. There are various websites that try to compare the two, but largely … Continue reading

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EdFest: Wilshaw

Wilshaw begins by likening the marquee to the Star Chamber, with its twinkly ceiling. He is speaking about comprehensive education and competitive sport. He wants to reclaim and celebrate the comprehensive ideal. He disagrees that the best way to address … Continue reading

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Edfest: E.D.Hirsch

Speaking on Skype about a conservative curriculum for disadvantaged children. He realised that a certain amount of background knowledge is assumed and called this cultural literacy, and that this is what should be taught in American high schools. Lindsay Johns … Continue reading

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